Farm Income Outlook Update

Courtney Cowley, Kansas City Federal Reserve (10th District) Economist, recently published an assessment of the current ag income environment as well as the risks ag income faces. Cowley suggested that near term ag income prospects are stable for now.

2014, 2015, 2016 showed steep US farm income declines compared to 2013, but the decline seems to have stopped. 2017 farm income is forecast to have been 3% higher than 2016, but this increase would still be 18% below the 47 year long run average. Banker’s expectations of future income decline are much lower, about 1/2 of the 2016 peak.

Cowley identified one major risk to future farm income which is the large inventories of corn and soybeans although wheat inventories are large as well. The corn stocks-to-use ratio has been increasing since 2013 from about 8% to nearly 17% for 2017. Most of this increase is due to above trend line yields for the past 3 years. The soybean stocks-to-use ratio was flat till 2015 and has doubled since. The large US crops of corn and soybeans have made exports a critical factor to support US crop prices. As that importance has increased, the US share of world wide corn, soybean and wheat exports has steadily declined since 1977. This decline comes due to competition from Brazil, Russia, Australia and increasingly Argentina. Another risk is the trade relationship the US has through NAFTA with Mexico and Canada. Both have increased ag trade with the US by about 2.5X for 2017. Thus NAFTA renegotiation is probably critical. A third risk to 10th District ag income is cattle profitability since about 50% of 10th District ag income comes from cattle production.

Ag income appears to have stabilized for now, but some risks are still present. Larger grain stocks along with increased cattle inventories might pressure ag income and farm/ranch profits. Continued large crop and cattle inventories will force reductions in farm/ranch costs. Many costs have already declined but land costs have remained sticky. Thus land rental rates and values are likely to continue a slow decline.

Source: Cox, C, “As Winter Looms, Key Risks Keep Ag Outlook Cool”, https://www.kansascityfed.org/research/agriculture/agoutlook/articles/key-risks-keep-ag-outlook-cool, accessed 19 Jan 2018.

 

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